[Album Review] Freak Heat Waves- Bonnie's State of Mind
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freakheatwaves

Release Date: February 3rd, 2015
Label: Hockey Dad Records

Man, that was some show those aliens put on. We were skeptical at first, thinking that these off-world stiffs would have no idea how to throw a party. We were wrong, although they scared the shit out of us at first when they blared this alarm as their spaceship came in to land, but it was all cool when they led into a danceable, synth-heavy rhythm (“Plastic-coated Dancers”).

Things got a little strange on their second number (“Bonnie’s State of Mind”) because it was all ambient jazz but done to a sci-fi groove. Finally, this dude beamed down in the next song (“Design of Success”) and, shit, did he ever know how to that dystopian disco party thing! It was all ’80s funk, glam and goth, and I’m not sure whether he was just aloof or they sent out an android. Not that we cared. It was so cool.

And so the evening went on like that, one eerily futuristic dance number after another. The android/aloof alien guy even did a totally impressive Ian Curtis impression, but the first time I think they got confused because it was more like Talking Heads than Joy Division (“Dig a Hole”). It didn’t matter because it was so funkified and discordant. In fact, discordance was a big thing on a few of the songs they played in the middle of the set, but they really had that jazzy, experimental, math rock, disco/glitter, krautrock thing down cold, you know what I’m saying?

All told it was a great night as we danced our brains out to the familiar (’80s synth pop, glam goth, etc) and the unfamiliar (well, don’t ask me, I don’t know how to describe it). I bet if these guys had visited 30 years ago they would have been punks, ‘cos I could still detect a snarl behind those automaton features. Here we call it post-punk, but of course that hardly describes it in the hands (do they have hands?) of these alien geniuses.

As they scooted off back to their home planet — where I’m sure this music is commonplace, even though we just marvel at it – I don’t doubt they were giggling and thinking, “Puny humans.”